How to Find a Job Teaching in China

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90% of the emails I receive are questions and concerns about teaching abroad in China.

I get it. Accepting a job in China is a scary proposition. It’s hard to know if you’re getting a good deal, or if your school is scamming you. If you’ve never been to China before, things can be even more stressful.

Is this a good salary for Beijing? Should I believe the reviews online that say it’s a scam? How do I know if I’m making the right decision??!! 

Trust me, I’ve been there.

Teaching in China

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My Teach Abroad Experience

For the last five years, I’ve been living in China, teaching and working in many different capacities.

I had a full-time job at a Chinese public high school as an oral English teacher. I’ve worked part-time jobs at agencies teaching children. I’ve had tutoring jobs with pre-schoolers, I taught Business English to Chinese businessmen. I even spent two years working as a college counselor in China!

In all of my time living, working and teaching in China, I’ve learned a lot about what it takes to get a great job here, and have an incredible experience at the same time. I’ve developed this blog as a China lifestyle resource, and I’ve even become a Go Overseas Teach Abroad expert in the process.

Try the Free Teach Abroad Mini Course!

UNNC graduation

Do you have a degree?

The Qualifications for Teaching in China

Firstly, let’s quickly go over the qualifications you’ll need to legally teach abroad in China.

In order to obtain a work visa, you’ll need to be a passport holder from one of the seven approved countries: USA, Canada, UK, Ireland, South Africa, Australia and New Zealand.

You’ll also need an authenticated Bachelor’s Degree, a TEFL Certificate, and a clean criminal background check. Some schools and cities will also require a few years of teaching or work experience in addition to all of these requirements.

For the best jobs, you’ll need qualifications, but many companies and schools are willing to let you work on student or tourist visas, or they’ll get you a business visa, which is technically illegal to work on. Then you’ll have to leave the country every few months.

I know plenty of people working in China without a bachelor’s degree or that aren’t native speakers and it’s definitely possible. However, it’s best to have as many of the requirements as you can. So, if you don’t have a bachelor’s degree or you aren’t a native speaker, I highly suggest getting yourself a TEFL to show that you’re qualified.

Heads Up: I have a special deal with MyTEFL, where my readers can get 35% off with the code ASIAADV!

teach abroad China coworkers

My coworkers at an ESL school I worked for

Public, Private, or Language Academy?

Next, you need to decide where you want to work: a language academy, private school, or public school. International private schools tend to have the best jobs, but they also have stricter requirements. Some may even require you to be certified to teach in your home country!

Public schools and language academies usually expect the same qualifications. However, the jobs themselves are very different.

At a public school, you’ll most likely be working Monday-Friday from 8 am- 4 pm, teaching large class sizes of 30-50 students. While at a language academy, you’ll work evenings and weekends teaching smaller class sizes.

Public schools tend to have a bit more vacation time since they follow the school schedule, while a language academy typically follows the national office holidays and may give you some additional vacation days to use throughout the year.

Neither one is a better option than the other. It’s all about personal preference!

teach English China

How To Pick a School in China

What does your ideal day look like? Do you want to spend your afternoons playing with little kids at a kindergarten? Do you want to teach an organized oral English class to high school students? What about tutoring kids for the SAT in the evenings?

Think about the age range of the students you want to teach and your ideal schedule. This will help you find a job that might work for you.

Also, be sure to think about what location you might like. Do you want to be in a big city like Beijing or Shanghai? Do you want to teach in a small town where you’re the only foreigner? Do you hate cold weather?

Keep in mind that most private schools in places like Beijing and Shanghai are not actually in the city. These schools tend to be located in the suburbs, while language academies and public schools are usually in the city. However, this isn’t always true, so be sure to look up the location of the school before you agree to anything.

Try the Free Teach Abroad Mini Course!

teach abroad China

Hanging out with coworkers!

How to Find a Job On The Ground in China

One of the biggest benefits of “just showing up” is that you’ll be much less likely to be screwed over because you can visit a school in person and decide for yourself if it’s a good fit for you.

Any salaried teaching job should cover your housing, and usually, they will either give you an apartment, or a housing stipend. If you’re on the ground, you can check and see how much your housing stipend affords you. For example, if you have a housing stipend of 3,000 RMB in Beijing, you’ll definitely need some roommates. In Ningbo, 3,000 RMB is more than enough to get your own, nice studio apartment.

The benefit of being in China while applying for jobs is that you can make connections and find a good recruiter who will set you up with a decent school. You might also have friends who know of a position, and you’ll be able to get a job that way.

While in China, you can also search for jobs online. For example, I found my college counseling job online while I was already in China. I could’ve easily gotten that job in America and it would have been fine, but living in China, I had the opportunity to visit my company’s Ningbo office before I decided to move to Beijing.

Teach Abroad TEFL

My crazy high schoolers!

How to Find a Job Online Teaching in China

If you’re not comfortable just showing up in China, or you need a free flight to be able to afford the move, finding a job online is your best option. However, it can be tricky to know where to look.

How do you know if the jobs are real, or if the company is good??

Over the past few years, I’ve made it my mission to find the best teach abroad jobs in China. Living and working in China for the past five years, I’ve made a ton of connections with some amazing schools.

Feel free to use me as your “friend on the ground” in China. Trust me, I know what to look for.

public school china

Working at Wuxiang Primary School

The Best Website for Finding Jobs – Career China

I’ve been searching for the absolute best website for finding jobs in China, and my new favorite is definitely Career China.

Not only does Career China have a ton of great jobs at both public schools and language academies, they also have some very great high-level positions. You can find jobs working as a college counselor, head teacher, or at an international school.

Career China also employes some excellent recruiters, so after you submit a resume and a quick video introduction, they will work with you to find an excellent school!

Even if you work with me to find a position, I also highly suggest applying on their site. It’s absolutely free so you have nothing to lose!

Browse for Jobs!!!

CACS Enreach

Halloween with my students

Check the Adventures Around Asia Jobs Board!

Living in China, I have a ton of connections within the education industry. I’m able to verify which schools are great, and which ones are scams, mainly because I know the people who work there personally.

For the last year, I’ve been compiling an awesome Teach Abroad Job Board which lists all of my recommended positions. I do not list a school on this board unless I know someone who works there personally.

It’s very important to me to verify the quality of the positions I promote. I do a TON of research before I ever suggest a position, and I’m in constant contact with these schools.

If you’re at all interested in a position, feel free to Contact Me and send me your resume! I’ll help you pick a job that’s right for you, and put in a good word for you!

Check the Job Board!

teaching english china

My Chinese coworkers

How Not to Get Scammed Teaching Abroad in China

I’m sure many of you are worried about being taken advantage of. It can be scary to move across the world for a job, and oftentimes you feel like you have no power.

I had no idea my school was in the middle of nowhere until I was dropped off on a highway surrounded by factories, and I can tell you first-hand you do not want to be in that situation.

Be sure to do your research on a school before you sign anything. Google for reviews, ask for the exact address and scan through your contract with a fine-toothed comb before you sign anything. You can even ask to speak with a current teacher!

ESL Teacher China

China loves Sports Day!

If you’re at all worried about what to look for, I highly suggest signing up for my free Teach Abroad Mini-Course, which will go through all the details

Try the Free Teach Abroad Mini Course!

To make your life easier, definitely have a look at Career China and my Jobs Board. We’ve done the heavy lifting for you when it comes to finding decent schools.

Just be sure to do your own research before you sign to make sure that the school is the right fit for you.

Teach Abroad in China

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Any Questions About Teaching Abroad in China?

Before you go, I have just one thing I want from you:

What is your biggest challenge when it comes to teaching abroad? What keeps you up at night? What questions do you need answered?

Leave me a comment below and I will not only get back to you, I’ll also use your questions to update my Free Teach Abroad Mini Course AND another awesome resource I’m creating for all of you! Be sure to sign up for the free course and I’ll let you all know when it’s finished.

I’m always checking back for new questions and comments, so if you write to me below, I’ll be sure to get back to you ASAP!

This post was originally published in March 2016, and updated in March 2018

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About Richelle

Expat, traveler, and spicy food lover, I've spent the last few years living in China and traveling around Asia. In my spare time I enjoy salsa dancing, exploring night markets and stuffing my face with street food.

24 comments on “How to Find a Job Teaching in China

  1. Hello! Really useful post! I am thinking about eventually teaching abroad, maybe not China, but somewhere I haven’t decided yet. Your post definitely re-ignited that curiosity in me of what it would be like to be a teacher somewhere else :) I will probably take the TEFL course at one point this year.

  2. Teaching English in China has been on the cards for a while to pursue our dream of traveling but its a scary move from a good and stable career. Your post has answered quite a few unanswered questions and concerns of ours. Thank you for a great post!

    • I’m so glad my post helped you! Coming straight from graduation I didn’t quite have a stable career to give up, but I completely know how you feel. Currently I work as a college counselor but I know in the next year or so, I’m going to put it aside to work for myself. It seems so scary to give up a stable paycheck and free housing and health insurance!

  3. I’d have no problem just showing up and conducting my own search, but if I want to work at a university wouldn’t I have to return to the U.S. to get an apostille of my degree and transcript?

    When is the best time to show up and look for university or public/private school jobs? When does the school year begin?

    • I’m not exactly sure about university jobs, but usually they want your original diploma, so you should just bring it with you from home. You might consider checking with a few universities before leaving. I think most universities tend to be very reputable, so you should feel comfortable applying from abroad, but if you want to head to China I’d consider doing it now-ish. The school year starts right at the beginning of September (possibly the very end of August).

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  11. Teaching english in China has always been a bit in the back of my mind and this is a great post inspiring bme to maybe make this idea a bit more concrete in the future.

  12. Hello Richelle!
    Your post has been of s much help as I am on my search for good teaching job positions in China. I see you mentioned great sources as of where the look but is there any way you could help me out finding a good one?

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